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Versace's View: Starring Nikon's D2x DSLR
Vincent Versace's Cinematic Workflow
Starring: Nikon's D2x, Photoshop CS2 and much, much more


Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Vincent Versace


Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Vincent Versace


Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Vincent Versace


Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Vincent Versace


Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Vincent Versace


Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Vincent Versace


Fig. 7
Fig. 7
Vincent Versace


Cintiq's 21UX LCD
Fig. 8

STEP #4 Light It In Photoshop CS2

Versace often employs Photoshop's Lighting Effects to transform the look and feel of his photographs. In the following example (Fig 6) Versace demonstrates how he turns relatively flat light into dramatic light using the filter. Note that the completed image also shows Versace's final composite work (Fig.7), with his signature edges, some branch removal and "harvesting" from three additional exposures.

"First duplicate your layer. Then select Filter>Render>Lighting Effects (Fig. 5). In the Lighting Effect's Style menu, select Soft Omni. Under Light Type, choose Omni. Move the center point of the first light onto the upper leaf (primary focus) and size down the diameter of the light slightly by clicking and dragging from the edge. It is best to make slider adjustments from bottom to top in the filter's menu. Under properties, increase the ambient light to +31, exposure to -33, material to metallic, and the gloss to shiny. Intensity should be 40. Click on 'Save, then OK and Replace' to save those settings as defaults.

Create a second light by clicking on the light bulb, located under the image preview, and dragging it to the point on the (Fig. 3 & 4)image preview that you want to highlight (in this case, the single leaf in the center of the foreground). Keep the Style as Soft Omni and settings the same, but change intensity to 20. Create a third light by clicking again on the light bulb and dragging the center point into the middle of the group of leaves on the right-hand side of the image. Select the Light Type as Soft Omni, with an intensity of 2, and click 'OK.' Make final tonal adjustments, scale it to your output size, and sharpen it for output."

STEP #5 Output: The File is Everything, the Print is All

As one of the original Epson Stylus Pros and host of the very popular Epson Print Academy (www.epson
printacademy.com
), which has traveled to over 30 cities nationally and internationally, Versace knows a bit about ink on paper. "I've been using Epson printers for over 12 years and I own a Stylus Pro 4000, 7600 and 9600 printer. With these printers, I use the Epson driver for color, and the ColorBurst RIP (www.colorburstrip.com) for neutral and toned black and white. My favorite papers are Epson's Textured Fine Art and Somerset Velvet for Epson. I prefer to use the papers in their sheet versions; I find them easier to handle than rolls, and they come already cut to my standard paper size, which is 24x30 inches. Lastly, it's critical to proof your prints in the same light source you plan to display them. I use GTI's viewing systems (www.gtilite.com) for full-spectrum daylight-balanced light, and halogen bulbs from SoLux (www.solux.net) to simulate gallery lighting."

Portions of this article have been partially excerpted from Vincent Versace's upcoming book, Welcome to Oz: Following the RGB Road, published by Peachpit Press (www.peachpit.com). To see more Versace images, visit www.versacephotography.com.

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A Cintiq Love Affair Introduction by Andrew Darlow. Text by Vincent Versace.

Wacom's Cintiq LCD displays are a vital part of the Versace workflow, and his newest Cintiq, the Cintiq 21UX, is especially near and dear to his heart. (Fig. 8)

The Cintiq is as important to me as any lens, and the accuracy of the 21UX is spectacular. The software allows me to load in almost every repetitive keyboard shortcut or menu command that I use, and with a quick tap on the screen with my stylus, any command can be quickly selected. A perfect example of this in action is to quickly employ a shortcut known as "The Move," which is a two-step Photoshop shortcut that creates a new layer by using the following keys (Cmd-Shift-N return/Ctl-Shift-N return) and then merges all visible layers with these keys into that new layer (Cmd-Option-Shift E-Return/Ctl-Alt-Shift E-Return), leaving the previous layers intact. Both of these key combinations can be programmed into one Cintiq's menu shortcut. The result is a master layer that contains all the previous layers.

I use the Cintiq 21UX's touch strips (located on the sides of the display), for zooming and scrolling through documents, and I even surf the Web and send e-mail with the Cintiq on a desk in front of me. Another great Cintiq feature is that it can rotate more than 180 degrees while retouching. I also Img.re that the Cintiq saves me about two to three hours per day versus using soap on a rope (I mean a mouse). I recommend turning off the touch strips on one side of the Cintiq depending upon whether you are right- or left-handed, which will prevent any unintended keystrokes. The Cintiq 21UX uses the same flat-panel technology as the Eizo CG-21 monitor, and I calibrate and profile it with GretagMacbeth's Eye-One Display 2 (www.i1color.com). It's so good, in fact, that I rarely need to refer to my Sony Artisan displays any more to check color and density. I always travel with a Cintiq whenever I'm in the field, and I've logged over a quarter of a million miles with it by my side.

For more information on Wacom Cintiq displays, visit www.wacom.com

Portions of this article have been partially excerpted from Vincent Versace's upcoming book, Welcome to Oz: Following the RGB Road, published by Peachpit Press (www.peachpit.com). To see more Versace images, visit www.versacephotography.com.


   







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