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Product Spotlight: Gary Fong's Lightsphere II
The Easy Way to Achieve Studio-Quality Lighting Indoors or on Location


Photo taken with Gary Fong's Lightsphere II Inverted Dome Diffusion System
Photos utilizing Gary Fong's Lightsphere II Inverted Dome Diffusion System.
M.J. Wilson


Photo taken with Gary Fong's Lightsphere II Inverted Dome Diffusion System
M.J. Wilson


Photo taken with Gary Fong's Lightsphere II Inverted Dome Diffusion System
M.J. Wilson



Early on, Nikon adopted 3D-Matrix metering technology, which used the flash-to-subject distance—determined by the autofocus mechanism—to calculate flash output for each photo. This technology was a huge advancement, since reflective metering is prone to errors, especially in wedding photography, where the subjects are wearing either all white, all black, or both in the same image!

Distance-to-subject metering is extremely accurate, and this advance—now adopted by other camera manufacturers—helped tremendously in getting accurate results for the digital photographer.

While metering methods have improved, we still need to keep a few things in mind, including:

  • Metering provided by the flash-camera combination gives you a value for an 18% grey card. With a high-key subject, make allowances or your image will be underexposed. Same with an overall dark subject.

  • Make sure the exposure throughout your image fits within the roughly 3-5 stop exposure latitude of your digital camera.

  • Diffused flash is the perfect solution with digital capture most of the time, because it brings up shadow areas and gives midtone ranges more color saturation and accuracy.

Armed with the latest flash technology and a good flash diffuser, you’ll see pleasing results a majority of the time. A little experimentation is all you need.


   







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